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A new study to see if 12 minutes of exercising could help fighting type 2 diabetes

Treatments for most common diseases have to be both effective and easy to apply. The less invasive the therapy is, the better. Diabetes is still impossible to cure, but now scientists from University of Queensland say that exercising could be an effective weapon in the fight against type 2 diabetes. In fact, as little as 12 minutes of physical activity a day can change a lot.

Scientists think that 12 minutes of exercising per day could help fighting type 2 diabetes. Image credit: Allen Watkin via Wikimedia, CC BY-SA 2.0

Scientists think that 12 minutes of exercising per day could help fighting type 2 diabetes. Image credit: Allen Watkin via Wikimedia, CC BY-SA 2.0

Of course, scientists will still have to prove this concept, but they have some solid reasons to think it might work. Some previous researches showed that even very short exercising routines, lasting for as little as four minutes, help improving cholesterol levels, blood pressure, fitness and vascular function, and even prevent fatal events such as stroke and heart attack. It is extremely important, because many people nowadays cannot fit complex, long exercising into their normal day, which is why such small amount of aerobic exercise is ideal. Now scientists want to see what difference would it make for the management of diabetes, helping individuals with the condition to live a healthier life.

Immediately scientists realized that in this case four minutes is not really enough, it is not going to make much difference, which is why they added eight extra minutes. These extra minutes will contain strength training. Professor Jeff Coombes, one of the scientists conducting the study, said: “We are assessing the health benefits of this exercise dose via several tests that measure blood glucose, fitness, cholesterol, body fat, and vascular function, which are all factors that increase the risk of cardiovascular disease”. Scientists say that they are focusing on people who are generally not very active physically as effects on their health would be easier to notice.

It is only beginning of this research and results cannot be predicted yet. However, other recent studies showed that short intervals of intensive exercising do help improving health significantly. And some of these effects are targeted towards symptoms of diabetes. This is why scientists are hopeful to see that as little as 12 minutes of exercising per day would help fighting type 2 diabetes effectively. If not, they are likely to test some longer exercising routines in order to find the minimum of physical activity that people could fit in their day and enjoy health benefits.

We will have to wait and see what this research will reveal. However, we already know that exercising improves overall health, so people should partake in it more.

Source: uq.edu.au